Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside, and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management
Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management
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Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management
Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management
Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management
 
HOA History
 
By Steve Petrini on September 08, 2009 | View all archives
 
The CID's origins can be traced back to a publication by the Urban Land Institute in 1964, also known as TB 50. This technical bulletin was funded by The National Association of Home Builders and by certain federal agencies: the FHA, U.S. Public Health Service, Office of Civil Defense, the Veterans Administration and the Urban Renewal Administration.

The Federal Housing Administration in 1963 authorized federal home mortgage insurance exclusively for condominiums or for homes in subdivisions where there was a qualifying homeowners' association. The rationale was that homes in tracts where there was a homeowners association would be more likely to maintain their value. The effect, however, was to divert investment from multifamily housing and home construction or renovation in the inner cities, speeding a middle-class exodus to the suburbs and into common-interest housing. The federal highways program further facilitated the process. In the 1970s, a growing scarcity of land for suburban development resulted in escalating land costs, prompting developers to increase the density of homes on the land. In order to do this while still retaining a suburban look, they clustered homes around green open areas managed by associations. These associations provided services that formerly had been provided by municipal agencies funded by property taxes; yet, the residents were still required to pay those taxes. Accordingly, local governments began promoting subdivision development as a means of improving their cash flow.

Another primary driver in the proliferation of single family homeowners' associations was the U.S. Clean Water Act of 1977, which required all new real estate developments to detain storm water so that flow to adjoining properties was no greater than the pre-development runoff. This law required nearly all residential developments to construct detention or retention areas to hold excess storm water until it could be released at the pre-development flow level. Since these detention areas serve multiple residences they are almost always designated as common area, which results in the need for a homeowners' association. Although these areas can be placed on an individual homeowner's lot eliminating the need for an association; nearly all U.S. municipalities now require these areas to be common area to insure an entity rather than an individual has maintenance responsibility. Real estate developers, therefore, have established homeowners' associations to maintain these Federally mandated common areas. With the homeowners' association already in place, the developers have utilized them to provide other amenities desired by home buyers.
 
 
 

 
Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management
Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management
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Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management
Montana HOA Management, Kalispell, Bigfork, Lakeside and Whitefish Home Owners Association Management